1. The U sees diversity and inclusion as a priority across campus.

"It seems like the institution wants to appear inclusive, but actual practices that support students of diverse backgrounds and identities varies widely from department to department and from setting to another."

"I know that we talk about it, but it seems to be a thing that only permeates some spaces, or that only occurs at the appropriate levels, I don't see it getting into the everyday lives of our students, and our faculty seem completely immune to the idea that diversity and inclusion exist."

"I believe administrators at the highest level see it as a priority, however, I do not believe it is a priority for some administrators at the college and departmental levels."

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The majority of participants are aware of numerous statements and messaging in varying entities across campus, but observe large disparities between upper and lower campuses and amongst college and department level efforts. Participants sense a disparity in priority, because of inconsistent definition of diversity and inclusion across the University. Across all demographics, many participants display concern over low rates of diverse student, faculty and staff retention, which they believe to demonstrate a need for greater priority of diversity and inclusion on campus. Students, in particular, feel tokenized and view the University’s statements on inclusion and diversity as superficial and contradictory to actions performed by administration. This demographic passionately calls for more representation in administration, staff and faculty and mandatory diversity and inclusion trainings in all departments.
[In our meeting with President Watkins, we … some stuff about Safe u and college consulting/strategic planning]

2. The U is transparent in communicating the issues, challenges and successes surrounding diversity and inclusion.

"I think this issue is a bit rocky. Yes, the U has sent out communications about racial incidents on campus and the challenges the administration faces. But at times this is not always the case. As a student you only know as much as the institution wants you to know. "

"The U does a good job of announcing the start of initiatives and the creation of task forces, but never demonstrates tangible outcomes that reflect progress or even genuine commitment to inclusion and diversity as a result of these interventions."

"It is natural to protect the brand. Sometimes it's hard to be honest and risk negative feedback. However, sometimes we need to be honest about where we are failing so we can course correct."

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While there are many who receive University announcements and statements, there is an overwhelming desire for more transparency in the process leading up to statements and results, which are currently being viewed as self-congratulatory or reactionary. All demographics request opportunities to be involved in dialogues, forums, committees and initiatives, with the majority of participants preferring to aid in countering challenges rather than watching administration take an initiative on issues surrounding diversity and inclusion without campus input. Participants involved with U Health request more communication between upper and lower campus, noting that many efforts are being doubled or unmentioned. Students especially plea for more transparency surrounding diversity and inclusion and demonstrate want for the whole campus to be more proactive. Many students feel their challenges are unacknowledged and criticism deflected by administration.
[Something about Social impact leaders and executive director position/interviews]

3. The U’s diversity-related resources and initiatives are easy to find and readily accessible.

"It is unclear what offices and staff are the appropriate people in charge of various diversity issues (undergrad, grad, faculty, staff). There are not enough resources devoted to these issues and it ends up being dealt with at the College and Department levels, which disproportionately impacts the time and effort of faculty of color and women."

"I think there is a lot going on on campus related to diversity but people don't know about it or don't access it."

"There a dozens of resources on main campus and in the health campus, yet they are not all communicating, connecting, and collaborating as well as they could be. I would even go as far to say they are estranged, and sometimes it feels as if there is a competitiveness."

"There is a diversity website, but any link to it is nowhere to be found on the main page. It's slightly embarrassing. Diversity needs to be included on the landing page, or so many prospective students have to actually put in work to find the resources which means they are not as readily accessible as they should be in the most obvious way."

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Participants concur they want a single, and more accessible, webpage for all diversity-related resources and initiatives. From the participants aware of resources, the bulk of comments explain difficulty in locating and sharing information about them. All demographics share confusion on responsibilities and services from various diversity and inclusion related offices on campus, also noting a sense that many of these entities don’t often collaborate.
[Talk about Diversity at a glace]


The Office for Equity and Diversity will be meeting with the University’s Marketing and Communications team to implement “Diversity at a Glance” on the U’s homepage and update the Safe U website by Fall 2018. Ongoing meetings with colleges and departments through the upcoming academic year will be held to implement college-level strategic plans by Fall 2019. A fourth survey question, which is not displayed on this page, gathered preferred platforms and means of communication (i.e. social media, websites, printed materials, etc.). [or something to this effect]